History of ADHD

History of ADHD

History of ADHD

What’s ADHD?

Previously referred to as a hyperkinetic impulse disorder, ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) is a psychiatric disorder that provokes poor concentration and behavioral unrest. It is more common in children although ADHD symptoms in adults are not unlikely at all. Patients of ADHD suffer prolifically since they fail to excel in life.

 

History of ADHD

Knowledge of ADHD was possessed by experts even as early as in the 18th century. If writings of physicians like Melchior Adam Weikard and Sir Alexander Crichton are studied, then corroborative evidence suggesting ADHD-like behavior can be found.

 

The maiden ADHD quote came from the British pediatrician Sir George Still in the early 1900s who found “an abnormal defect of moral control in children”. Later in 1936, when the medicine Benzedrine was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and was given to young patients, Dr. Charles Bradley noticed an astounding side effect: it enhanced academic performances of children!

 

However, ADHD was not recognized until the introduction of the modern ADHD drug Ritalin. In 1980, ADHD was finally included in the American Psychiatric Association’s list of mental disorders. The ADHD definition included potential symptoms of absent-mindedness, impulsiveness and hyperactivity.

 

ADHD in modern day

By the end of the twentieth century, symptoms of ADHD in kids were on the rise. Simultaneously, there was increasing public awareness about the signs of ADHD and also, doctors were becoming more proficient in dealing with ADHD cases. Research and development in the pharmaceutical industry has helped to introduce more effective ADHD medications.

 

Today, scientists are engrossed in extensive research regarding ADHD. They are endeavoring to find better means of tackling ADHD and the causes of this disorder. While genetic connections to ADHD have been proved, it is still not clarified how environmental elements influence the development of ADHD.

Sponsored Links